“Mise en Place”

“A Chef’s Kitchen,” is one of my favorite series on Netflix. Each hour long series explores the mind, habits and cultural influences that shape the body of work of Michelin star chefs around the globe. I watch an episode when I am in search of inspiration or to re-awaken my eye to the beauty of small things all around.

Any chef worth their salt is familiar with the French term, “mise en place,” or, “everything in its place.” Have you ever gotten cooking on a fun new recipe at home only to notice several steps in that you needed to marinate the fish or blanch the vegetables before adding it to the pot? Now you have to hustle to address those details (usually all the difference between an out-of-this-world or so-so dish), skip them entirely or risk burning what you’ve currently got sizzling. Your symphony of taste and texture suddenly morphs into a haphazard mess.

Fortune favors the prepared.

As in the kitchen – so on your yoga mat. As we close our month-long practice of Saucha in the studio, take a look at these common guidelines for yoga etiquette, are there areas for your practice to improve?

Arrive early. The first 5 – 7 minutes of class are called Integration and critical to connecting to your body and breath.

“OM” is sacred. If you are a few minutes late, enter the studio as quietly and respectfully as you can. If you hear the class chanting, “om” wait until they are complete before you enter the room.

Check your bags at the door. The studio space is sacred. Leave your bags, shoes, cell phones, extra layers of clothing in the locker room. Arrive through the back door.

Keep a clean space around your mat. Arrange your block, strap and water to one side of your mat. A cluttered practice area can easily translate to a cluttered head space. On the functional side, keeping your props neatly grouped ensures the teacher won’t trip (well at least not on your stuff) and that you can find what you need easily.

Stay in the room. Stay in the practice. Yoga is a moving meditation, any break from the practice takes you out of the present moment – and everyone else around you, too. Even something as innocuous as standing up and walking to the back of your mat for water can be distracting. In those moments when you absolutely cannot resist your water bottle, take child’s pose and sip discreetly.

You create the energy in the room. Yoga is meant to be a contemplative and meditative journey of movement. Fill the room with your breath, your energy and not your words. The teachers are on hand after class to answer any questions you have or you can quietly flag them over to assist you. Conversation should be limited to before and after class.

Acknowledge Your Growth. We clap at the end of class to acknowledge ourselves and our fellow practitioners – not to applaud the teacher. Honor your work and the contribution of those around you by giving a hearty round of applause once class has come to a close.

There’s an old adage, “Take your practice seriously and yourself lightly,” smiles, sighs and gentle laughter are always encouraged. This week, as you step on your mat, try putting these pointers in place and watch how your practice transforms.

See you on the mat, yogis!

Lauren Christian

Lauren is an avid reader, yoga teacher, mom, wife, entrepreneur and proud Co-Founder of Five Peaks Power Yoga. When she’s not at the studio teaching or practicing yoga, she can be found in the Loudoun County country-side enjoying the vineyards with her family. Sometimes, she even runs marathons.